Atheists make a big fuss about the “problem of evil” and how they cannot in good conscience accept that God exists in the face of a world full of innocent people suffering tremendously due to disease and poverty. Curiously, they are not equally perturbed by the prospect of innocent people suffering tremendously at the hands of the wicked who themselves live comfortable lives and will never have to face any consequence or repercussion for their crimes.

And when you think about it, which scenario ought to be more troubling? In the world of the theist, innocent people who suffered due to disease and poverty will ultimately be recompensed for the pain they endured. But in the world of the atheist, evil is never requited.

How ironic, then, for atheists to accuse the God they don’t believe in of being unjust when they are otherwise perfectly content with the idea of a world without ultimate justice.

Atheists make a big fuss about the "problem of evil" and how they cannot in good conscience accept that God exists in…

Posted by Daniel Haqiqatjou on Monday, December 14, 2015

Daniel Haqiqatjou

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  • Evil, in and of itself, does nothing to prove whether or not there is a God. The ‘problem’ of evil, really only speaks to the character of this God: if God is all-powerful, all-good, and all-seeing, then it would seem that there should be no evil. If you posited a God who was malevolent, incompetent, and/or blind to our suffering, I wouldn’t says this was problematic in light of evil. (Though I’m sure we could debate whether this could rightfully be called God.)

    As such, the atheist does not have a “problem of evil.” Evil (as actions and deeds, not as some sort of ‘spiritual’ force) simply is. It is unfortunate; it is terribly saddening; but it’s existence it not problematic.

    I am not content with the world being unjust. I want to do what I can in my life to make it otherwise, but no, I do not see any reason to believe that there is any “ultimate” form of justice.