I believe in blaming the victim in some sense and in some cases.

For example, there are some men who are accused of rape who are in fact completely innocent of that. Their accusers were friends, girlfriends, or hookups, people they wanted to have casual sex with. But little did they know that after the fact, after the enjoyable evening was over, their partners would go to the authorities and accuse them of sexual assault. What a rude awakening. Simply being accused of rape is enough to result in numerous debilitating consequences even absent criminal charges or a conviction, e.g., getting expelled, losing a job, having the label “rapist” attached to your name for the rest of your life, etc.

So these men are definitely victims. But they should have known better. Didn’t they understand the risks? Hadn’t they heard about the “rape accusation culture” and how the definition of sexual assault has been expanding in recent years such that what once might have seemed innocuous in their minds may actually now be considered a sexual violation in the minds of their female partners? If they were aware of all these possibilities, why did they insist on their risky behavior? Why did they play so close to the edge? As far as we’re concerned, these men behaved irresponsibly. Sure, they didn’t want to be accused of rape. But it happened, and their poor decision making was a clear contributing factor.

That doesn’t mean they deserved to have their lives destroyed by false rape accusations. And it certainly doesn’t mean that we hold their accusers in any less contempt, with any less opprobrium.

But, strictly speaking, sometimes victims should have known better and we shouldn’t be shy to say it. What better way to discourage other men from engaging in the same risky behavior. In fact, if we are truly interested in reducing the number of men being falsely accused of rape, we are required to make ourselves clear on the risks and call out mistakes that victims have made so that others do not repeat them.

If you want to call this “blaming the victim,” fine, though that is a deliberately misleading expression used by feminist ideologues. Recognizing and acknowledging someone’s mistakes is not always the same as blaming them. Keep that in mind.