12 COMMENTS

  1. Once again, a guy in his thirties acting like a teenager. I used to have alot of respect for DH, but I couldn’t look at him the same after that cringy “white knight” video. And now this childish “Monday memes”. And yes, White knights are disgusting. I agree with perhaps 99% of the arguments DH makes but I no longer support him as behavior is absolutely unIslamic. Using mockery and insults as a means of Da’wah is absolutely unIslamic. And not only myself, but many many conservative voices in the Muslim community are no longer supportive of DH for the exact same reason despite agreeing with majority of his arguments.

    • DH is creating an atmosphere where liberal ideas will get stomped in the Muslim community, good job. However I wish you could clarify those points assadullah raised.

      • I am all for stomping on Liberal agendas. But this style and method is unacceptable. And are these movies whose references are being made even jaiz to watch? If watching movies is haram (since most contain nudity and profanity) then using them as references (supposedly for making Islamic points) is equally reprehensible.

    • >Using mockery and insults as a means of Da’wah is absolutely unIslamic.
      Bring your proof from the Quran and the Sunnah that what you’re saying is correct. You can’t just declare things as haram based on your feelings and intuition.

      Being sweet and flowery in front of blatant kufr, corruption and injustice does not imply that one has a good character. To the contrary, it could be red flag that one is indifferent to what is going on.

      >but many many conservative voices in the Muslim community
      Could you please point to us where one of these “conservative voices” have proven the statement you made that “using mockery and insults as a means of Da’wah is absolutely unIslamic” (i.e. completely haram)? That could save us and yourself some time.

  2. How does being averse to the memes imply that one is oblivious to the corruption of Islam? Many of us are solid in our support for the deen. We do speak against false ideologies with conviction and clarity while finding this particular tone and style of delivery repulsive.
    To counter the criticism with “you must support Asadullah’s article” or “you are being sweet and flowery” is not just a distraction tactic. It is also contrary to reality.

    I find the occasional meme amusing, but to dedicate a serial blog post to it is over-the-top, and, to be frank, most of these memes are cliched and not humorous.

    This website has been a breath of fresh air, but it is losing direction with this type of content that is neither useful, nor funny.

    • >“you are being sweet and flowery” is not just a distraction tactic. It is also contrary to reality.
      Look, I wasn’t accusing you of being that. Sorry if that’s how it came across. I was just addressing the statement that you made earlier about mockery and insults always being haram. I understand that there are several cases where they are, but we can’t say that every kind of mockery or insult is always wrong.

      >I find the occasional meme amusing, but to dedicate a serial blog post to it is over-the-top, and, to be frank, most of these memes are cliched and not humorous.
      >
      >This website has been a breath of fresh air, but it is losing direction with this type of content that is neither useful, nor funny.
      I agree with you wholeheartedly, this website and Daniel’s channel has been a breath of fresh air for me too, because he unapologeticaly stand for Islam against some very prevalent and dangerous ideas of our time. Most of these memes imo are neither effective nor well-crafted. On top of that they are out of place, they don’t belong in this website. There is a really BIG contrast between the “Monday Memes”-series and the rest of the content on this site.

      • >Most of these memes imo are neither effective nor well-crafted. On top of that they are out of place, they don’t belong in this website. There is a really BIG contrast between the “Monday Memes”-series and the rest of the content on this site.

        EDIT:

        I take back what I said. I would like to express my views in a better manner that can better show my appreciation for what my brothers and sisters are doing.

        Some memes do have their place, but context is important, and so is the type of message you’re trying to convey.

        Let’s take for example the Nike+LGBT meme, that would likely be entertaining and informative to an audience that has seen the recent anti-Islamic Nike ad, it can be informative because it highlights the anti-Islamic elements of the ad that may not be so obvious at first glance. It also mocks Nike’s anti-Islamic message in a way by showing the blatant and disgusting nature of it. On top of that it’s a message by the poster of the meme that “No, members of the LGBT community should rather become muslims” in an equally blatant, yet funny way.

        Conveying a serious message that require more explanation however, may require another medium where the details can be explained and the seriousness properly highlighted. Take for example the attempts to indoctrinate schoolchildren into liberalism in the west. This is a very serious issue, it’s not one that we can assume the audience fully understands, and thus it requires a medium like the ones I’m talking about here. Such a medium can be for example a well-written article, or an informative video. Mashallah, Daniel is good at both, and I hope Allah makes him even more efficient at conveying the message of Islam.

        So I believe I sort of understand where some commenters who are critical to memes as a medium are coming from. But I still want to say that we shouldn’t disregard this medium entirely, because it may have its place.

  3. Daniel, I challenge you to a basketball match. If you lose, you’ll have to come with me to the next women’s march.

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